Good morning and happy Monday! I figured we could all use a little deer hunting trivia fact to start our weeks off right. So…Have you ever wondered why we refer to antler points on a deer as a G2, G3, G4, etc?

Well it’s pretty simple, but I imagine many people are unaware as to how this came about. I actually just learned about this recently and I thought it was pretty interesting, so I just had to share. Forgive me if this is common knowledge for some of you.

That being said, if you’ve ever logged your buck’s Boone & Crockett score, you probably have a clue. On the official Boone & Crockett scoring sheet each section of measurements is labeled with a letter. Section A is number of points on each antler, Section B is the tip to tip spread and it turns out that the area in which you tally each tines length is called the G section. So section G-1. is where you write in the length of the first tine, section G-2. is where you insert the length of the second tine and so forth and so on. Over time as people used these scoring methods more and more, it eventually became easy to just refer to the tines themselves with these terms. So G2’s were born (and G5, the company, got a brand name!)

So there you have it, the arbitrary labels on the Boone & Crockett scoring sheet have led to the now popular reference of antler tines as G’s. Gotta love deer hunting, you can learn something new every day.